Catching Fire: Capitol Couture as a marketing campaign explained

capitolcouture

Ever since Capitol Couture started its Catching Fire marketing this year, there have been mixed responses from fans. While there are some who are excited about getting an insight into the lifestyle of the Capitol, others feel uncomfortable wondering if maybe we’re going in the wrong direction. We have seen the Capitol through the eyes of an impoverished District, and know the luxury we see is an evil. So what’s up with Capitol Couture?

BuzzFeed Entertainment listed 5 points that fans of the franchise need to know about Lionsgate’s curious marketing campaign. Check out excerpts that explain Capitol Couture’s agenda:

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1. It is meant for fans, not newbies.

Don’t expect any handholding with this campaign — to understand and appreciate it, you must be already well-steeped within the world of Suzanne Collins’ bestselling trilogy of young adult novels, or, at least, the 2012 blockbuster based the first of those books.

And that’s exactly the point, explains Steve Coulson, creative director for the transmedia marketing firm Campfire, which has created specialized campaigns for Game of ThronesAmerican Horror Story, and Discovery Channel’s Shark Week (but has no involvement with Capitol Couture). These kinds of complex, “in world” campaigns, says Coulson, are designed specifically to boost the excitement of hardcore fans: “There is less of a likelihood that this kind of medium is going to bring in new audiences than it will engage existing fans and give them something to evangelize.” The more excited you are about the movie, the more likely you are to talk about it with your friends who maybe aren’t as passionate as you are.

3. It also features designers from the movie itself, as if they work in the Capitol.

The lines just get blurrier in the section highlighting the designers for The Hunger Games: Catching Fire itself, all of whom are presented more or less as Capitol citizens. “They just emailed me asking me if I would like to be a part of it, right before I was going to take a nap,” says 21-year-old designer Daniel Vi Le, who created many of the film’s elaborate head and neck pieces. “I just woke up and ran to my computer. It was a ‘pinch me’ moment.”

Le says he was totally fine with the conceit that he lives in the Capitol, especially since it gives him exposure he would never otherwise get at his age. “I think it’s a great opportunity, how they’re premiering up-and-coming designers,” he says. “It’s giving us an opportunity to flourish more than what we could ever imagine.” In just the week since his profile went live on the Capitol Couture site, he’s already noticed a marked increase in his followers on his Tumblr and Twitter pages.

5. It hopes to elevate the Hunger Games brand.

Even the most devoted Hunger Games fans have to admit that the first film’s depiction of the Capitol felt a bit undernourished (read: cheap). The latest trailer for Catching Fire has already made clear that the new film isn’t skimping on the spectacle. But by embracing the chic luster and top flight design associated with the world of high fashion — right up to the entrancing opening splash pages for each issue of the site — the Capitol Couture campaign can create an even more lasting impression that the production value for Catching Fire will better match fans’ high expectations.

Read the rest here.

What’s your response to Capitol Couture, and all the content we have seen from it? Let us know in the comments below!

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